Onward, little travelers

Recently, I met someone who asked me where I live. She was curious and asked about the place I lived before that and then before that. Then she asked The Question.

Do you have any kids?

Nope.

Oh, that’s why you can move all around the planet like that.

Conversation got side tracked and I didn’t get the chance to tell her:

*that there’s a reason for bassinets on planes
*that children are extremely adaptable beings; at times more so than adults
*that most of my colleagues and many friends have lived globally for many years with kids
*that the world is becoming more transient as we speak and children do not hinder this

In fact, I had just read a post by Almost Fearless blogger, film-maker, mom, Christine Gilbert about this very topic. She culminated her family’s 2011 experience abroad in a clever montage of photographs called “Baby’s First Trip Around the World”.

Looks to me like Cole and parents are doing just fine going from India to Cambodia to Thailand. And this is a family who doesn’t have the assurances that we do in the international school realm.  As an international teacher, your child’s tuition is included. When sick, the school guides you to the nearest pediatrician or hospital. Health insurance is a given and sometimes, day care is provided.

What makes Christine and her family extraordinary is that they figure out how to make their transient lives work without a guide book that lays it all out for them. They’re examples of people who have a vision and go for it, with baby in tow. And this is just one example. There are many traveling families going on adventures world-wide.

  • Family on Bikes: follow a family of 4 who bike from Alaska to Argentina
  • Jenss Family travels: A family traveling the world and writing about it for National Geographic Traveler’s blog.
  • Travels with Baby: Adventurous guidebook author offers travel tips to new and veteran parents alike.
  • Soul Travelers 3: A thoughtful family three years into an open-ended round the world journey, currently in Spain.

Just when Craig and I wondered if we could have a baby AND step out of the safety that is international teaching, I find blogs like this that say:

Yep, sure you can.

                                                                                                                 photo credit

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12 comments
  1. Marcela Avila said:

    Claro que si amiga…..querer es poder….great way to reframe what for many sounds so scary….living abroad with a baby is doable…just a matter of perspective.

    Miss you guapa! Hope to hear from you on FB>>>did you ever get to read my extra-long message?

  2. Lindsay Chandler Mandjek said:

    I agree 100%. Kids are FINE with it all – it’s the adults that stress out. So excited to hear more about what becomes of your life adventure! Bisous from DC!

  3. Absolutely, there is no reason travel should end when baby comes. All the reason for more!

  4. I love you, my beautiful sister! Wonderful post. One of my baby’s first global journeys will be going to Laos to visit her tia!

  5. susan toms said:

    Ho w inspiring, I love the “can do” spirit

  6. Liam said:

    My daughter Helena was born in Spain in 2007, and we took her to 19 countries before she was two, from Morroco to Turkey, Sweden to Russia, and everywhere in between. We got to know parks, playgrounds and locals with young children quite well , slowing down for every feeding or diaper change or playtime or naptime gave us a deeper appreciation for the journey. I am glad to hear you may be contemplating parenthood, which is the most incredible journey of all ( even more so after we had a second daughter Juliet last summer!)

    Cuidate,

    -Liam

  7. First of all, congrats, Liam! You guys are living proof that this is totally doable. Thank you for your comment. Best wishes.

  8. Thanks for the comment, Susan. I am inspired too. Funny what is now considered as conventional, right?

  9. I love that. Thanks for all of your support, Monica.

  10. THanks for the support, Lindsay. Sending you best wishes.

  11. Thank you for the comment! Appreciate it.

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